Welcome to Ultraviolet Studio

Written by
AJ Comsti '23, ODUS Communications Fellow
March 10, 2022

Princeton students have access to the Ultraviolet Recording Studio, located in the basement of Bloomberg Hall. With the equipment available there, aspiring student artists can top the Spotify charts in no time.

Ever wanted to produce your own music, but didn’t know where to start? If so, you’re not alone, but there’s good news: as a Princeton student, you have access to the Ultraviolet Recording Studio, located in the basement of Bloomberg Hall. With the equipment available there, aspiring student artists can top the Spotify charts in no time. 

Ultraviolet Studio Control Room

Courses in Princeton’s Music department are geared primarily towards music theory and history, and the modern practices of mixing and recording are far less researched than classical instrumental music. With this in mind, Ultraviolet was established in 2018 as a space for students to explore their non-academic passions for creativity and modern music making. As one of the current student managers, Christian Ayers ‘23 shared, “There’s so many creative people here, but there was no place for them to meet.” Many Princeton students play and love music, but until Ultraviolet was established, there was no formal space for those interested in mixing digital tracks or even just recording live instrumentals. The studio now fills that role and provides all the necessary equipment – from instruments like guitars, keyboards, and drum kits, to recording gear and mixing programs – to make your music producing dreams a reality. A comprehensive inventory of available equipment can be found here.

Ultraviolet Interior Studio Alternate Color

Before using Ultraviolet, undergraduates must do a brief introductory round of training with one of the studio’s student managers. The studio is geared towards those with some experience already with mixing and recording, so this session is not a beginner’s lesson on how to create tracks and balance audio. Instead, this orientation is more to familiarize students with the space, processes, and specific devices available. For example, student managers explain where to find the necessary microphones, or how to send audio from the instrument room to the recording booth. After this introductory meeting,and signing off on the terms of use, students will have 24/7 access to Ultraviolet! 

The managers encourage everyone interested to reach out and get involved with the studio. “I wish Ultraviolet was more well known where more producers use it, and that there was a bigger music community,” said Caroline Zhao ‘25, in her first year of serving as a manager. Students hoping to help make that dream a reality, can reach out to her or any of the other student managers found on the Ultraviolet webpage and get started on the next chart topping hit!